Welcome to our Roman Coin Identification Website…

With this introduction to our Roman Coin website, i hope to be able to show you how we are doing it differently, as within this site you will find most coins associated with the Romans, with the rarer ones being added when a positive ID has been made & we can get a reasonable photograph…

Also we will be adding many different types of  links, taking you to reliable sources outside of this website, whether the links relate to an ID website, – books to buy, or coin auction sites… We are trying not to be “link reliant” but because i could never get the information together in my lifetime as these guys have, i think it is only sensible, to introduce the reader to their work, as i would never plagiarize their hard work, and dedication to their chosen subject – so credit where credit is due…

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Hopefully most Roman Coin’s found in Britain will be found on here, & we will be updating as we go, so a project this huge will never be finished, also we will try to include as many of the Coins from within the Roman Empire as we can… The reason we will be extending our coin ID outside of Britain is because the Romans moved around there Empire, played games for money, trinkets etc, the same as soldiers do today, so a lot of items such as coins or trinkets would be classed as curios and be gambled with, then subsequently lost, this is why many strange or foreign minted coins come to light, & could have been lost from a soldier or a citizen, with a good example being the different mint marks found on coins lost in Britain…

So when any new coins are found and given an ID, we will endeavour to post these on here with a positive ID and a clear photo… With a good example shown here, of an Antoninianus struck by Carausius in 291AD…

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click here for a link to the full story…

We always Want Clear Photo’s with an I.D. for our I.D. Parade… 

An exert from E.R.I.C.

Most Roman coins feature religious or military themes. Issues of a civic or purely secular nature are relegated to a secondary role and the few times they appear they are still meant to glorify the pomp and glory of the emperor and, by extension, the Roman people… naturally, this emphasis on consistency carried over into their currency, & policies. For hundreds of years millions of coins were handmade by untold numbers of craftsmen and almost every one is instantly recognisable to the collector or student as Roman….  It is remarkable that in good times and in bad they could be counted on to make one coin look nearly identical to the next, even to the bitter end, when coins were little more than metal scraps with scribbled on designs they retained a “look & feel‟ uniquely Roman, asides from aesthetics the Romans were consistent as to the design & choice as to the appearance of the coins…

 

a coin from 1974, found in the river in Nottingham